Posts made in May, 2013

Happy Birthday – William Henry Seward, May 16, 1801

Posted by on May 16, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – On this day in 1801 William Henry Seward was born in Florida, New York. He attended the academy in Goshen, graduated from Union College at fifteen years of age, and taught school in Georgia. Elected to the new York State Senate in 1830, Seward became Governor of New York in 1838. He was Secretary of State in Lincoln’s cabinet, a post which he conducted with skill. Interested in expansion of the United States, he helped the country to purchase Alaska. He also favored annexation of Hawaii and the Dutch West Indies. Mr. Seward died in Auburn, New...

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Portion of an Article in THE NEW YORK TIMES of March 10, 1976

Posted by on May 15, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – The following is from an article in THE NEW YORK TIMES of March 10, 1976: Cecile Hulse, who was born and raised in Bellvale, New York has recently passed away in her residence, the Prince George Hotel in New York City, at the age of 81. She was a June 1908 graduate of the eighth grade at Warwick. In her long and varied career, she painted orchids in the jungles of Mexico and South America. Her most memorable exploration was in the jungles of the United States, gathering material for the book entitled SUWANNEE RIVER, which won her a Literary Guild...

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The burying grounds of 150 or 200 years ago were often in a corner of somebody’s farm property, (more)

Posted by on May 14, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – The burying grounds of 150 or 200 years ago were often in a corner of somebody’s farm property, and usually the only people buried there were members of the household. On a farm near Wisner, however, such a plot was used by the whole neighborhood, and the owner, Crynes Bertholf, decided to give this half-acre of land in his will to be forever used by the people of the area as a cemetery. It is known as the Locust Hill Cemetery and is beside King’s Highway. The next family to own this same farm, the Belchers, sold a corner plot of land to...

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Almost as soon as Warwick had settlers, it had inns.(more)

Posted by on May 13, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – Almost as soon as Warwick had settlers, it had inns. Although there is no record of which was the first, it was undoubtedly Baird’s Tavern, still standing on Main Street. Among its first guests of note was the Reverend James Manning, a young Baptist clergyman who traveled in the colonies with an eye to their spiritual condition. He preached in Warwick’s Baptist Meeting Ho…use in 1779, ate Sunday dinner at the tavern, and found it excellent. This is the same Manning who founded what is now Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island....

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Heavy Rains Threaten Onion and Celery Crops (1950)

Posted by on May 10, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – Black dirt farmers brought to the attention of the Orange County Board of Supervisors in 1950 the fact that excessive rainfalls, presumably due to the rainmaking activities of Dr. Wallace Howell of New York City, were ruining their crops. They also started a move to obtain an injunction against New York City to prevent further rainmaking activities and moved to sue for crop damages. The Supervisory Board passed a resolution by Dr. John Kane of Goshen, which called upon the Board of water Supply of New York to “cease immediately all attempts to...

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