Posts made in September, 2013

Lehigh and Hudson Railroad – 1927

Posted by on Sep 30, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – The following are some facts taken from an article, “THE VILLAGE GREEN AT WISNER”, which appeared in an issue of  THE L & H SEMAPHORE in 1927. Wisner has the Lehigh and Hudson Railroad to thank for the half-acre of lawn in the middle of the village which transforms what otherwise would be an ordinary little railroad settlement into something of the dignity and beauty of an old England Village. The buildings of Wisner, arranged as they are around the village green, with a background of huge maples growing along Wawayanda Creek, and a...

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In 1921, “Sherwood” or Sherwood Hall, was opened high in the hills of Warwick (more…)

Posted by on Sep 28, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – In 1921, “Sherwood” or Sherwood Hall, was opened high in the hills of Warwick and more than two miles from the village by the New York Telephone Company. The former McBurney property, including the house called the Lodge, and additional land, provided a place for rest and recreation for the company’s girl employees from all over the state. In 1924, the East House was completed and the West House in 1926. About 110 convalescent girls could be accommodated, staying two to eight weeks. Additionally, Camp Sherwood with a large central...

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In the early 1930’s, Joe Jackson and his wife Margaret came to visit Greenwood Lake. Mrs. Jackson’s mother ran a boarding house for actors and show people, known as Mother Rialto’s, (more..)

Posted by on Sep 25, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – The following was taken from the GREENWOOD LAKE STORY. In the early 1930’s, Joe Jackson and his wife Margaret came to visit Greenwood Lake. Mrs. Jackson’s mother ran a boarding house for actors and show people, known as Mother Rialto’s, which was situated on Cascade Road. Joe Jackson was a trick bicycle comedian known as “Shoeless Joe”. He later teamed up with Jimmy Duranta and Eddie Clayton. While here in Greenwood Lake, he decided to open a swank supper club at a site he had found which was an old barn at the...

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At the time of the Revolution, the routes from Newburgh to Sussex; one through Goshen and Warwick, and the other through Chester and Warwick; were used a great deal for troop movements (more)

Posted by on Sep 24, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – The following was taken from the book TWO CENTURIES IN WARWICK. At the time of the Revolution, the routes from Newburgh to Sussex; one through Goshen and Warwick, and the other through Chester and Warwick; were used a great deal for troop movements and for messengers between Pennsylvania and New England because the Newburgh-Beacon Ferry was rated as the most southerly route that was safe from British or Troy raiders. Among troop movements, of which we have positive evidence, was that of Morgan’s Virginia Riflemen to Boston in 1775, when they...

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According to an old program printed by the Warwick Advertiser Printing Establishment, a grand organ concert took place….(more)

Posted by on Sep 24, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – According to an old program printed by the Warwick Advertiser Printing Establishment, a grand organ concert took place in the Reformed Church of Warwick on Friday evening, September 23, 1870. The doors opened at seven-thirty with the concert commencing at eight o’clock. Those featured were: Mr. William Price of New York City, the builder and organist; Mr. F.G. Neibuhr, organist of the Reformed Church, 48th Street and Fifth Avenue of New York City, the accompanist; and Mr. R.A. Wheat of Warwick, the conductor. Organ selections, a chorus with...

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