Posts made in January, 2014

This SHOULD make us feel better. . .today we have balmy 30 Degrees!

Posted by on Jan 31, 2014 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – It was reported to be twelve degrees below zero at the Borden Plant in Warwick. It was eight degrees below at the Freight House, six degrees below at Schreiber’s, four below at William Bradner’s, and two below at the Ketchum Home. Old Sol refused to shine with the weather getting colder and colder! Of course, this weather was fine for ice. It was being harvested daily. Think of the nice cold ice cream and goodies next summer! This was on January 31, 1923.

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School Daze. . .

Posted by on Jan 28, 2014 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – In Hannah Demorest’s diary of 1877-1885, a bit of humor appears in the following stories. On a certain day in January of 1884, there was a terrible time in the New Milford School. One of the pupils, John Horton, sent an inkwell at Mr. Broderick, the teacher, and was expelled by the trustees. The Demorest family attended a wedding in Brooklyn of an old friend. It was beautiful, and the girls looked so pretty. When the bride and groom left, Hannah took off her shoe and threw it at the carriage to show her happiness. This was the custom. The boys,...

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Shingle House – Restoration Will Keep History Alive!

Posted by on Jan 28, 2014 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – Daniel Burt Jr. of Warwick and Martha Bradner, from what is now Wisner, were married on January 25, 1770, and moved into the Old Shingle House on Forester Avenue. The house was begun in 1764 and was the first structure in the village. Daniel Jr.’s father and his uncle, Benjamin Burt, had first seen Warwick in 1746 when they came from Ridgefield, Connecticut, and bought land from Benjamin Aske, one of the original grantees under the Wawayanda Patent.┬áIn 1760 Daniel Burt Sr., after selling his original land, the present Welling Farm, and the land...

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Water Comes to the Village of Warwick via the Mistucky Reservoir in 1872

Posted by on Jan 24, 2014 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – A great celebration was held in the National Hall at 1:30 pm on this day of 1872 to commemorate the occasion of water from the Mistucky Reservoir being piped into the Village of Warwick. This had been completed in the late fall of 1871. Grinnell Burt, in addressing a group from all portions of the county, praised the progress of the village in so short a time since its beginning. “The introduction of water to the Village of Warwick was the great and crowning act of all,” he said. He went on to say, “We have a waterworks second to...

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Owned by the Society — The Shingle House — A Haven for Tourists in 1830!

Posted by on Jan 23, 2014 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – A widely known landmark, the old shingle house on the Wallace Dusinberre Farm near Edenville, burned to the ground on this day in 1907. The house was built in 1734 and was one of the oldest landmarks in southern New York. It was erected by Major Jacobus Post, one of the founders of Edenville. In 1830 it was purchased by D. C. Dusinberre and had been an heirloom of his family. Tourists had visited the place often. Its history was told many times in the New York dailies. When first built, the house was an inn situated on the old turnpike between Newton...

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