Posts by Alex

Rediscovering and Preserving the Fishkill Supply Depot and Revolutionary War Cemetery

Posted by on Nov 4, 2013 in All Event Postings, Curator's Choice Talks, News and Press | 0 comments

Rediscovering and Preserving the Fishkill Supply Depot and Revolutionary War Cemetery

The Warwick Historical Society invites you to attend their November Curator’s Choice Presentation. Please honor all of our veterans by attending an event that reflects upon our first veterans and their revolutionary sacrifice. Veteran’s Day, Monday, November 11, 2013, 7:00PM at the Buckbee Center, located at 2 Colonial Avenue. Reservations preferred. Please call 845-986-3236 or e-mail whs@warwick.net. Tickets may be purchased at the door; $10.00 per person, refreshments served. Reflecting Upon Our First Veterans Rediscovering and Preserving the Fishkill Supply Depot and Revolutionary War...

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Curator’s Choice Series Continues – Dutch Clergy in Colonial America, Sleepy Hollow and the Early Dutch

Posted by on Oct 22, 2013 in All Event Postings, Curator's Choice Talks, News and Press | 0 comments

Curator’s Choice Series Continues – Dutch Clergy in Colonial America, Sleepy Hollow and the Early Dutch

Russell Gasero is a seasoned archivist with the Reformed Church in America and Professor John Coakley is on staff at New Brunswick Theological Seminary.  Both of these gentlemen have a wealth of knowledge and share their expertise regarding Dutch history, Dutch culture, the Dutch of yesterday and their influence on today through a captivating shared presentation. This Curator’s Choice is, once again, hosted by the Warwick Historical Society at the Buckbee Center, located at 2 Colonial Avenue, Warwick.  On October 29th, the doors will open at 6:30, reservations are preferred (please call...

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In 1921, “Sherwood” or Sherwood Hall, was opened high in the hills of Warwick (more…)

Posted by on Sep 28, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – In 1921, “Sherwood” or Sherwood Hall, was opened high in the hills of Warwick and more than two miles from the village by the New York Telephone Company. The former McBurney property, including the house called the Lodge, and additional land, provided a place for rest and recreation for the company’s girl employees from all over the state. In 1924, the East House was completed and the West House in 1926. About 110 convalescent girls could be accommodated, staying two to eight weeks. Additionally, Camp Sherwood with a large central...

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In the early 1930’s, Joe Jackson and his wife Margaret came to visit Greenwood Lake. Mrs. Jackson’s mother ran a boarding house for actors and show people, known as Mother Rialto’s, (more..)

Posted by on Sep 25, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – The following was taken from the GREENWOOD LAKE STORY. In the early 1930’s, Joe Jackson and his wife Margaret came to visit Greenwood Lake. Mrs. Jackson’s mother ran a boarding house for actors and show people, known as Mother Rialto’s, which was situated on Cascade Road. Joe Jackson was a trick bicycle comedian known as “Shoeless Joe”. He later teamed up with Jimmy Duranta and Eddie Clayton. While here in Greenwood Lake, he decided to open a swank supper club at a site he had found which was an old barn at the...

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At the time of the Revolution, the routes from Newburgh to Sussex; one through Goshen and Warwick, and the other through Chester and Warwick; were used a great deal for troop movements (more)

Posted by on Sep 24, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – The following was taken from the book TWO CENTURIES IN WARWICK. At the time of the Revolution, the routes from Newburgh to Sussex; one through Goshen and Warwick, and the other through Chester and Warwick; were used a great deal for troop movements and for messengers between Pennsylvania and New England because the Newburgh-Beacon Ferry was rated as the most southerly route that was safe from British or Troy raiders. Among troop movements, of which we have positive evidence, was that of Morgan’s Virginia Riflemen to Boston in 1775, when they...

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