At the time of the Revolution, the routes from Newburgh to Sussex; one through Goshen and Warwick, and the other through Chester and Warwick; were used a great deal for troop movements (more)

Posted by on Sep 24, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – The following was taken from the book TWO CENTURIES IN WARWICK.
At the time of the Revolution, the routes from Newburgh to Sussex; one through Goshen and Warwick, and the other through Chester and Warwick; were used a great deal for troop movements and for messengers between Pennsylvania and New England because the Newburgh-Beacon Ferry was rated as the most southerly route that was safe from British or Troy raiders.
Among troop movements, of which we have positive evidence, was that of Morgan’s Virginia Riflemen to Boston in 1775, when they camped one night near Sugar Loaf. Later was the march in 1779 of the Third New Hampshire Regiment and other detachments to join General Poor’s Brigade at Easton, Pennsylvania, for the Sullivan expedition against the Indians. One of the groups is known to have camped one night at what is now the intersection of Forester Avenue and Galloway Road. Others camped at the Washington Spring near the corner of New Milford and Sanfordville Roads.