“Warwick in History” – Present day maidens might be interested to know a little of how brides were arrayed and wedded in the long, long ago. (more)

Posted by on Apr 25, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

“Warwick in History” – Present day maidens might be interested to know a little of how brides were arrayed and wedded in the long, long ago. One married in 1798 had 150 guests at the ceremony. Six pigs and twelve turkeys were roasted for the feast. Five female slaves waited on the guests, and the merry party danced until four o’clock in the morning. Cider, applejack and peach brandy were on the sideboard. Generous neighbors lent a helping hand in contributing to the feast, and several friendly Dutch ovens in nearby farmhouses assisted in baking 300 rusk and as many biscuits. Towering piles of bread and cake added to the scene. Branches of evergreen interspersed with sprigs of the same, dampened and rolled in flour until snowy white, were used to trim the room. The floor was sanded in “herringbone” pattern. The bride wore a scarlet camelot petticoat and a white dimity short gown: a string of amber beads encircled her neck. The bracelets on her wrists were of velvet, embroidered with pale blue beads.