Work and Wonder in the Same Story – A “Husking Frolic!”

Posted by on Oct 10, 2013 in Warwick In History Minutes | 0 comments

 
“Warwick in History” – The following was taken from UNDER OLD ROOFTREES by E.B. Hornby.

Of all the merrymakers of the olden days the “husking frolic” was perhaps the gayest. the farmer invited his friends and neighbors, who husked all day, and in the evening the barn was swept and garnished, and heaped-up baskets of corn were brought in. Soon the girls of the neighborhood joined the huskers and took part in the work. Whenever a red ear was found, a kiss was claimed. There was a strong suspicion that all the red ears found during the day were laid carefully a side to do duty for the evening, and there was always much wonder expressed at the amount of the red ears “this year”. After all were finished, the merry strains of the fiddle began; and blithe was the dancing on the old barn-floor; gay was the supper, and sweet the two-by-two strolls homeward after all was over, through the delicious light of the full moon.

 
Photo: "Warwick in History" - The following was taken from UNDER OLD ROOFTREES by E.B. Hornby.

Of all the merrymakers of the olden days the "husking frolic" was perhaps the gayest.  the farmer invited his friends and neighbors, who husked all day, and in the evening the barn was swept and garnished, and heaped-up baskets of corn were brought in.  Soon the girls of the neighborhood joined the huskers and took part in the work.  Whenever a red ear was found, a kiss was claimed.  There was a strong suspicion that all the red ears found during the day were laid carefully a side to do duty for the evening, and there was always much wonder expressed at the amount of the red ears "this year".  After all were finished, the merry strains of the fiddle began; and blithe was the dancing on the old barn-floor; gay was the supper, and sweet the two-by-two strolls homeward after all was over, through the delicious light of the full moon.
After all were finished, the merry strains of the fiddle began; and blithe was the dancing on the old barn-floor; gay was the supper, and sweet the two-by-two strolls homeward after all was over, through the delicious light of the full moon.